Chapter News – July/August 2018

GREAT LAKES

GREAT LAKES - TTC
l-r: Tracey Ehl, Katrina McCullough, Joanne Cordell, Jodi Ball, Carrie-Lynn Ognibene, and Michelle Dwyer.

The Great Lakes Chapter marked its fifth anniversary by hosting the 2018 Annual General Meeting on June 12, 2018 at the Leslie Barns, a new state-of-the-art Toronto Transit Commission facility near Lake Ontario.  The meeting was an opportunity to look back on the year and do some thinking about what comes next.

Through 2017 and early 2018, the Chapter continued its modest growth, and maintained a strong financial position.  Members were invited to join a series of P2 drinks networking evenings, with topics ranging from Engagement Best Practices to P2 and Fake News.  To overcome the chapter’s large geography, the team experimented with an online book club to explore The Truth About Stories via its LinkedIN group.

At the AGM, the new executive team was announced, including:

  • Jodi Ball
  • Joanne Cordell
  • Michelle Dwyer
  • Tracey Ehl
  • Donna Kell
  • Karla Kolli
  • Katrina Kroeze
  • Carrie-Lynn Ognibene

Together, the group’s first activity will be to plan an engaging and manageable approach for the upcoming year.

We have many things to be thankful for!

  • Thank you to our members, long-term and new, for sticking with the Chapter on this journey. You are always welcome to jump in with your ideas and energy as you are able.
  • Many thanks are extended to outgoing executive members Kyal Butler, Chris Gurski and Tracy Manolakakis who have generously shared their time and talents.
  • Thanks also go to David Nagler and the TTC team who hosted the AGM at the Leslie Barns, its new facility at the corner of Leslie and Lake Shore. The facility was built to maintain its new fleet of low floor light rail vehicles.  There was much public interest and engagement throughout the design process, which was led by TTC staff and Strasman Architects Inc..  The facility is built to Toronto Green Development standards, and it features a storm water management pond, new trees, a green roof and enhanced streetscaping outside and a paint booth, maintenance, testing and control centre inside.

As the executive team turns its attention to the year ahead, any and all ideas from members are welcome.  Get in touch at:  to greatlakes@iap2canada.ca


BC

In just over a month, the BC Chapter will welcome the world to Victoria for the IAP2 North American Conference!

Our Chapter appreciates and thanks all of our local volunteers that have helped plan the program, fun and more to help ensure it is a great conference for all.

As @iap2bc is new on Facebook and Twitter, we decided to hold a contest to get members to share the word — and win a Conference registration at the same time! Thanks for all the follows, likes, share and retweets…the lucky contest winner is XXX (TBD July 17).

Why not follow us to keep up-to-date on our Chapter’s events and member fun?!

The IAP2 BC Chapter is busy finalizing details for events this fall but are looking forward to various training opportunities throughout the province from Sept-Nov 2018. Check out our training & events calendar for details and to register.


PRAIRIES

IAP2 Canada Prairies Chapter is proud to announce the launch of our new page on LinkedIn!  Our new home on LinkedIn will help us communicate with a broader audience also making it easier for members to share IAP2 updates and information about training and events within their own networks.


PRAIRIE - JULY PHOTOThe Chapter hosted an evening of conversation on how to embrace High Emotion. Leanne Jarocki (centre), SaskPower Public Engagement Consultant, shared about that agency’s program that gives customers a voice in the outage planning and notification process. There’s never a “good” time to be without electricity, but SaskPower is using IAP2-centered engagement and consultation to understand the customers’ needs and expectations better.

Colleen Opseth (right), Engagement Advisor with the Government of Saskatchewan, presented a case study of a parent and stakeholder project to design a funding model for Autism Spectrum Disorder. A diagnosis of ASD often means big emotional and financial challenges — and frustration — for a family, and good planning and collaborative approaches led to a design — and helped build relationships.

Lawrence Baschak (left), Manager of Enterprise Performance Management with the Ministry of Environmentshared stories from the field including Canadian Heritage River planning on the Churchill River, forest management advisory committee facilitation, and land use planning in northern Saskatchewan.  Lawrence finished off our evening  with a light-hearted list of do’s and don’ts when engaging in high emotion.


Upcoming Course

IAP2 Strategies for Public Opposition and Outage in Public Participation

Tuesday Sept 11 and Wednesday Sept 12, 2018 Regina, SK

In these challenging times and charged environment, you need strategies and behaviours to work more effectively with communities and stakeholders who are angry, frustrated and outraged.   This two-day workshop is practical, hands-on participatory mix of video, lecture, group exercises and draws upon decades of real world experience in high stakes, high conflict situations.

Stephani Roy McCallum, Founder of Dialogue Partners and Chief Storm Rider at the Courageous Leadership Project is excited to partner with the IAP2 Prairies Chapter to bring IAP2 Strategies for Public Opposition & Outrage in Public Participation to the Prairies chapter in Winnipeg and Regina.  Steph brings her 25 years of experience in high stakes, high emotion public engagement, her background as a leadership coach and her talent for creating constructive environments for brave, honest conversations™ to the training.

The cost of this two-day course is $825.  A course discount of $125 is available for IAP2 members. Please contact us to receive your discount code at prairies@iap2canada.ca.

Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/o/stephani-roy-mccallum-courageous-leadership-project-15123267987

 

CERTIFICATION STORIES – Jessica Delaney

Jess-window-web-200x300I’ve been in P2 for over fifteen years and have seen the practice evolve from a “Community Relations” exercise into a sophisticated and step-wise process. I very much wanted to be a part of and support any move to building the practice of engagement and public participation.

The certification process is not quick, nor should it be. Beyond an in-depth application and preparing a case study there is an intensive few days at a session where applicants are evaluated on their understanding and application of IAP2’s engagement foundations and their ability to design an engagement plan.

Here are some of the things I did to prepare  — and some things I wish I had done better:

  1. Set aside the time required to complete the process. I wish I had put aside more, larger blocks of time.
  2. Start an engagement log. There’s a requirement to demonstrate a depth and breadth of engagement techniques and experiences so be sure to start a log. I’d recommend printing out the application form a year before you are going to apply so you can ensure you meet all the requirements before you start the application process.
  3. Ask process questions often. The CP3 accreditation is relatively new, so ask questions and seek clarity on all aspects.

My goal was to become a CP3 and I completed that in late 2017. The long-term goal is to see the practice of public participation continue to evolve and serve the needs of not only proponents and sponsors of processes, but community. We need to ensure that it’s not only government and industry who are proficient in process design, but citizens, non-profit organizations and community associations.

CERTIFICATION STORIES – Anne Harding

What does it mean to be a Certified Public Participation Professional and have that CP3 tacked onto your name? We tell you that it indicates that, as a P2 practitioner, you meet or exceed a set of internationally-recognized criteria; but what does it mean for individuals? Read on, and find out what your P2 colleagues who’ve achieved CP3 are finding about the process and its results.


anne harding-3I decided to get my certification for a number of reasons: I believe in the program, I believe in IAP2 and the professionalization of the practice and at the time, I was the only certified CP3 who practices P2 “in-house” within a company (Suncor Energy). More than that, it was about checking on my own skills, having worked in the resource sector for 11 years and following IAP2 Core Values and Code of Ethics, so this was a good opportunity for my own professional development to test where I was at.

The application stage does a really good job of helping you identify if the process is right for you. A good first step would be to read through the whole application: that can help you decide whether you want to go through it. It takes a lot of time to prepare an application that reflects on your experience as a P2 professional.

And then it gets more fun, because you get to do a case study. I really enjoyed that, but then, maybe I’m a bit weird because I do P2 as a hobby, often as a volunteer in my various communities. Two of my three projects used in the application were volunteer projects* and only one was as a paid P2 professional. It was a good exercise to flex my P2 muscles that I don’t necessarily get to do on a daily basis.

Writing the application took a lot of reflection on the different work that I’ve done and recognizing that the skills and criteria for P2 competency don’t exist in start-to-finish decision-making processes, but that there’s plenty of opportunity in our communities to put P2 skills to use, bringing people together to support better conversations. That’s what P2 is about: engagement with people on a human level and being able to articulate that, whether it’s to move an organization forward or create change or build a community garden or a pipeline, being able to gather people together and get their views into the changes that are being made is what it’s all about.

When I went to the assessment centre (a two-day process, face-to-face with examiners), I found the process was set up so I could show my best. I didn’t feel like the assessors were there to try to find mistakes or identify my flaws, but to help me show my best work in action. The assessment centre activities are actually a continuation of the case study and I was able to think in the moment and solve problems and look at ways forward.

There were two stages: on Friday night, there was the interview and then the next day was team-based, with an opportunity for all of us candidates to work together. We could play off one another’s strengths and learn from one another. Everyone got to respond to their case study questions, and then there were new challenges thrown into the mix that we worked through together.

I have found a number of benefits of being certified. At work, they recognize my CP3, and my teammates and managers are interested as we look to improve our own practices. My involvement in IAP2 has always been seen as an asset to the company, as I take the knowledge I’ve gained and apply it in my work. My company has been incorporating ideas and practices from IAP2 into its approach to P2 for decades, so taking lessons from the certification program as we build our internal competency models is a natural and helpful next step.

What I appreciated about the process is that it wasn’t a test of whether I knew the IAP2 method or followed the Foundations training to a “T”. It was about my ability to lead meaningful community engagement in a number of different ways. This was a distinction I didn’t really see until the assessment centre. It wasn’t about following The Book. The Book is great for understanding the basics, but this was an exercise in responding “in the moment” – because we know that life is not a textbook – so the process is about responding to things as they come up. What’s more, it’s given me more confidence in my own practice in my work and in all my communities!


*One of Anne’s community projects received the IAP2 Canada Core Values Award for P2 for the Greater Good in 2015. Watch the video here.

Registrations are going fast / Les inscriptions vont bon train

 

Registrations are going fast for the 2018 IAP2 North American Conference, Sept. 5-7 in Victoria, BC! Have you signed up yet? (Register here.) Is money an issue? You may qualify for a scholarship to attend the Conference, if you’re a full-time student, a new community advocate or a staff member at a non-profit group (except for government agencies). Download the application here.

Almost as important — have you booked your room at one of our three partner hotels? The hotels are offering us great rates during the Conference and for the 3 nights before and after, but the rooms are booking up quickly, too! Find out more here.

What’s on offer? Well, when setting up a public consultation process, have you ever thought that the best practices could be found in a shopping mall? Dave Meslin, originator of the Dazzling Notice Awards (and partner in the Visual Engagement Award, to be presented at this year’s Core Values Awards), posits that P2 practitioners could learn a lot from Apple, Wal-Mart and The Home Depot, in their customer engagement practices. providing welcoming, engaging environments for customers. User Experience Design: What Governments can Learn from IKEA and Apple looks at the way they provide welcoming, engaging environments, and compares that to the often unfriendly and intimidating world of government spaces and programs.

Did you know that community participation and community well-being go hand in hand? That’s certainly the case in many developing countries, as they look towards sustainable development as the way of the future. In Community Empowerment through Public Participation Process, Caroline Uoko and Dr Margaret Owuor will share findings of case studies in Kenya, where participatory resource management is still relatively new. These studies demonstrate the importance of inspiring communities next to natural resources to be part of the management of those resources.

Les inscriptions vont bon train pour la Conférence nord-américaine 2018 de l’AIP2, qui aura lieu du 5 au 7 septembre à Victoria, en Colombie-Britannique! Vous êtes-vous inscrit? (Cliquer ici pour s’inscrire). Peut-être n’avez-vous pas les moyens d’y assister? Si vous êtes un étudiant à temps plein, un employé d’organisme sans but lucratif (non gouvernemental) ou un défenseur des droits des collectivités nouvellement en poste, vous pourriez être admissible à une bourse vous permettant d’assister à la conférence. Téléchargez le formulaire de demande ici.

Autre point presqu’aussi important – Avez-vous réservé votre chambre auprès de l’un des trois hôtels partenaires de l’événement? Ceux-ci nous offrent d’excellents tarifs pour la durée de l’événement et pour les trois jours précédant et suivant la conférence, alors ne tardez pas et réservez votre chambre avant qu’ils n’affichent complet! Plus de détails ici

Que retrouvera-t-on au menu de la conférence cette année? Eh bien, lors de la conception d’un processus de consultation publique, avez-vous déjà envisagé vous inspirer des pratiques exemplaires de certains commerces de détail? Selon Dave Meslin, organisateur des Dazzling Notice Awards (et partenaire du Prix de l’engagement visuel qui sera décerné cette année lors du Gala des prix d’excellence), les praticiens de la P2 auraient beaucoup à apprendre des pratiques adoptées par des entreprises telles que Apple, Wal-Mart et Home Depot en matière d’engagement de la clientèle. L’atelier User Experience Design: What Governments can Learn from IKEA and Apple (« Expériences clients : ce que les gouvernements peuvent apprendre d’IKEA et d’Apple ») se penche sur les façons dont ces entreprises offrent des environnements accueillants et stimulants, et compare ceux-ci aux climats hostiles et intimidants qui caractérisent souvent les espaces de travail et programmes gouvernementaux.

Saviez-vous que la participation communautaire et le bien-être communautaire vont de pair? C’est certainement le cas dans de nombreux pays en voie de développement, où le développement durable est vu comme étant une voie d’avenir. Lors de la séance intitulée Community Empowerment through Public Participation Process (« Les processus de participation publique, outils de renforcement communautaire »), Caroline Uoko et Margaret Owuor, Ph. D., partageront les résultats d’études de cas réalisées au Kenya, où la gestion participative des ressources est une pratique relativement récente. Ces études mettent en lumière la nécessité de stimuler et d’influencer les communautés situées à proximité des ressources naturelles afin qu’elles participent à la gestion de ces ressources.

Membership Fees Go Up July 1, 2018 / Augmentation des droits d’adhésion à compter du 1er juillet 2018

 

First increase since IAP2 Canada was established.

Did you know that IAP2 Canada membership fees have not increased since 2011 when IAP2 Canada was established. But your organization has continually expanded and improved its services to members. We’ve instituted the monthly Learning Webinars, Mentorship Program, Professional Certification, Research, Job Postings and — new this year — the IAP2 Canada Skills Symposium.

We support your local chapters, co-host the annual North American Conference, and help you keep in touch with other members through our Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter presence.

And we want to do more, including ramp up advocacy for good P2, establish a resource library and continue to work towards becoming a truly bilingual organization from coast to coast to coast. You can find out about all these initiatives to support and enhance your practice here.

IAP2 Canada needs to grow in order to support these initiatives, so as of July 1, 2018, the price for an annual individual membership will rise $25 to $175.00 per year. Bundle memberships will also increase by an average of 15% per year; student memberships will stay at $50/year. You’ll see the increase when your membership comes up for renewal.

If you have any questions about this increase please contact us at info@iap2canada.ca.  Thank you for your ongoing support of IAP2 Canada and of good public participation in Canada.

La première hausse depuis les débuts de l’AIP2 Canada.

Saviez-vous que les droits d’adhésion de l’AIP2 Canada n’ont jamais augmenté depuis les débuts de l’AIP2 Canada en 2011? Cependant, votre organisation a élargi et amélioré les services offerts aux membres de façon continue. Nous avons mis sur pied des webinaires mensuels de formation, un programme de mentorat, un programme de formation professionnelle, des projets de recherche, un babillard d’offres d’emploi et – pour la première fois cette année – le Symposium des compétences de l’AIP2 Canada. Nous appuyons vos sections locales, co-organisons la Conférence nord-américaine annuelle et vous aidons à rester en contact avec d’autres membres par le biais de notre présence sur Facebook, LinkedIn et Twitter.

Et nous souhaitons en faire encore plus, notamment intensifier la promotion de bonnes pratiques dans le domaine de la P2, mettre sur pied une bibliothèque de ressources et poursuivre les efforts déployés afin de devenir un organisme véritablement bilingue d’un bout à l’autre du pays. Cliquez ici pour vous renseigner sur ces initiatives destinées à soutenir et à améliorer votre pratique.

Pour appuyer ces initiatives, l’AIP2 Canada doit continuer de croître. Par conséquent, à compter du 1er juillet 2018, le prix d’une adhésion annuelle individuelle augmentera de 25 $, pour un coût annuel de 175 $. Les adhésions de groupe connaîtront également une augmentation de l’ordre de 15 % par année, tandis que les droits d’adhésion des étudiants seront maintenus à 50 $ par année. Ces augmentations figureront sur votre avis de renouvellement.

Pour toute question concernant cette augmentation, n’hésitez pas à communiquer avec nous à l’adresse info@iap2canada.ca. Nous vous remercions de votre soutien continu à l’AIP2 Canada et à la promotion d’une saine participation publique au Canada.

Volunteer Opportunities with IAP2 Canada (May/June 2018)

Do you want to get more involved with IAP2 Canada? We have a number of openings for volunteers on our committees: Communications & Marketing; Training; On-Site Volunteers for the 2018 IAP2 North American Conference. 

Communications & Marketing Committee

Do you have marketing and communications skills to share?

As a Communications and Marketing Committee member, you can help Canadians know the value of IAP2 Canada. You will participate in the development and implementation of new and updated tools and programs based on the 2017 IAP2 Canada Communications and Marketing Strategy Plan. And you can work in a team environment with like-minded people with a passion for promoting IAP2 Canada. This is a one-year renewable volunteer position.

Deadline for applications is June 11, 2018Communications & Marketing Committee Application.


IAP2 North American Conference on-site Volunteers

Would you like to be a part of an exciting conference?

As a member of the on-site team of volunteers, you will create an inviting atmosphere for event attendees, a successful experience for the sponsors and exhibitors, and meet P2 people from across North America. The conference is held in Victoria, B.C. at the Victoria Conference Centre. On-site volunteers are needed for registration desk and conference hosts from September 5 to 7, 2018.

Deadline for applications is June 30, 2018. 2018 IAP2 NAC On-Site Volunteer Job Description and Application.


Training Committee
Do you have a passion for encouraging lifelong learning?

As a Training Committee member, you can help inspire better public participation. You will participate in the development and implementation of new and updated tools and programs based on IAP2 Canada Training Strategy Plan. And you can work in a team environment with like-minded people with a passion for promoting P2 through IAP2 Canada. This is a one-year renewable volunteer position.

Deadline for applications is June 11, 2018. 2018 Training Committee Job Description and Application

The 2018 IAP2 North American Conference — what’s on tap?

(P2 is a Team Sport)

What happens when your city’s growth suddenly explodes and new initiatives demand public participation? “Engagement fatigue” and staff burnout follow — that’s what. The city of Austin, Texas, has seen its population grow over the last decade to the tune of 100 people per day, and the situation has not been helped by often vitriolic divisions of opinion.

The solution? The Conversation Corps: a team of trained volunteer facilitators, dedicated to promoting civil dialogue and pushing the envelope of P2 best practices. We’re excited to welcome folks from Austin with P2 is a Team Sport, the story of their five-year journey. You’ll get some on-the-ground insights on promoting a culture of civil discourse and how to work with other agencies to grow a P2 culture.

(Inclusive Engagement with Vancouver’s Chinatown)

Vancouver, BC, is famous for its Chinatown, but that historic community has felt itself in danger of being swallowed up by the rapid growth of the city. Public processes have failed to be inclusive, leading to distrust and loss of community support for projects and plans.

In Inclusive Engagement with Vancouver’s Chinatown, Miranda Eng of Context Research will share their recent collaborative work with community members from Vancouver’s Chinatown to co-create a model to guide culturally respectful planning and design of engagement processes.

(Using Directed Storytelling and Journey Mapping ….)

“Storytelling” has become more popular in recent years for drawing out opinions and ideas, but how do you put it to work effectively in a P2 process? The session, Using Directed Storytelling and Journey Mapping For Deep Engagement, uses the Salt Lake City Library as its object lesson. The Library uses world cafes, focus groups and storytelling to determine what its customers need, want and hope for — and it appears to be working: the Library recently got an historic increase to its budget. Peter Bromberg of the Salt Lake City Library and Stacee Adams of Somers-Jaramillo + Associates will provide you with tools you can use right away in your own practice.

(Public Engagement on Critical Public Policy ….)

When emotions run high in any issue, a proper public engagement approach is often the only road to a solution. The Province of Ontario is tackling racism head-on, and Public engagement on critical public policy: Managing Ontario’s Anti-Racism Consultation describes the P2 process used to develop a constructive dialogue around this vital issue. Roanne Argyle and Brendan Agnew-Iler designed and implemented an engagement strategy for Ontario’s Anti-Racism Directorate. They invited the community to help lead the process and welcomed conflict and emotion into the process, so that energy could be harnessed. Plan to attend this session to learn how they did it.

(Prevent “Truth Decay”)

Do public participation professionals have an obligation to help stakeholders find the truth or are we only obligated to capture their “truth?” That’s a good question, and in Prevent “Truth Decay,” Sam Imperati and Devin Howington will show how the P2 profession is in the perfect position to ensure that issues are explored – not debated, and decisions are informed – not reactionary. You’ll come away with insights and approaches for separating opinions from facts and better able to promote trust and encourage stakeholder collaboration.

(User Experience Design)

When setting up a public consultation process, have you ever thought that the best practices could be found in a shopping mall? Dave Meslin, originator of the Dazzling Notice Awards (and partner in the Visual Engagement Award, to be presented at this year’s Core Values Awards), posits that P2 practitioners could learn a lot from Apple, Wal-Mart and The Home Depot, in their customer engagement practices. providing welcoming, engaging environments for customers. User Experience Design: What Governments can Learn from IKEA and Apple looks at the way they provide welcoming, engaging environments, and compares that to the often unfriendly and intimidating world of government spaces and programs.

(Community Empowerment through P2 Process)

Did you know that community participation and community well-being go hand in hand? That’s certainly the case in many developing countries, as they look towards sustainable development as the way of the future. In Community Empowerment through Public Participation Process, Caroline Uoko and Dr Margaret Owuor will share findings of case studies in Kenya, where participatory resource management is still relatively new. These studies demonstrate the importance of inspiring communities next to natural resources to be part of the management of those resources.