Registrations are going fast / Les inscriptions vont bon train

 

Registrations are going fast for the 2018 IAP2 North American Conference, Sept. 5-7 in Victoria, BC! Have you signed up yet? (Register here.) Is money an issue? You may qualify for a scholarship to attend the Conference, if you’re a full-time student, a new community advocate or a staff member at a non-profit group (except for government agencies). Download the application here.

Almost as important — have you booked your room at one of our three partner hotels? The hotels are offering us great rates during the Conference and for the 3 nights before and after, but the rooms are booking up quickly, too! Find out more here.

What’s on offer? Well, when setting up a public consultation process, have you ever thought that the best practices could be found in a shopping mall? Dave Meslin, originator of the Dazzling Notice Awards (and partner in the Visual Engagement Award, to be presented at this year’s Core Values Awards), posits that P2 practitioners could learn a lot from Apple, Wal-Mart and The Home Depot, in their customer engagement practices. providing welcoming, engaging environments for customers. User Experience Design: What Governments can Learn from IKEA and Apple looks at the way they provide welcoming, engaging environments, and compares that to the often unfriendly and intimidating world of government spaces and programs.

Did you know that community participation and community well-being go hand in hand? That’s certainly the case in many developing countries, as they look towards sustainable development as the way of the future. In Community Empowerment through Public Participation Process, Caroline Uoko and Dr Margaret Owuor will share findings of case studies in Kenya, where participatory resource management is still relatively new. These studies demonstrate the importance of inspiring communities next to natural resources to be part of the management of those resources.

Les inscriptions vont bon train pour la Conférence nord-américaine 2018 de l’AIP2, qui aura lieu du 5 au 7 septembre à Victoria, en Colombie-Britannique! Vous êtes-vous inscrit? (Cliquer ici pour s’inscrire). Peut-être n’avez-vous pas les moyens d’y assister? Si vous êtes un étudiant à temps plein, un employé d’organisme sans but lucratif (non gouvernemental) ou un défenseur des droits des collectivités nouvellement en poste, vous pourriez être admissible à une bourse vous permettant d’assister à la conférence. Téléchargez le formulaire de demande ici.

Autre point presqu’aussi important – Avez-vous réservé votre chambre auprès de l’un des trois hôtels partenaires de l’événement? Ceux-ci nous offrent d’excellents tarifs pour la durée de l’événement et pour les trois jours précédant et suivant la conférence, alors ne tardez pas et réservez votre chambre avant qu’ils n’affichent complet! Plus de détails ici

Que retrouvera-t-on au menu de la conférence cette année? Eh bien, lors de la conception d’un processus de consultation publique, avez-vous déjà envisagé vous inspirer des pratiques exemplaires de certains commerces de détail? Selon Dave Meslin, organisateur des Dazzling Notice Awards (et partenaire du Prix de l’engagement visuel qui sera décerné cette année lors du Gala des prix d’excellence), les praticiens de la P2 auraient beaucoup à apprendre des pratiques adoptées par des entreprises telles que Apple, Wal-Mart et Home Depot en matière d’engagement de la clientèle. L’atelier User Experience Design: What Governments can Learn from IKEA and Apple (« Expériences clients : ce que les gouvernements peuvent apprendre d’IKEA et d’Apple ») se penche sur les façons dont ces entreprises offrent des environnements accueillants et stimulants, et compare ceux-ci aux climats hostiles et intimidants qui caractérisent souvent les espaces de travail et programmes gouvernementaux.

Saviez-vous que la participation communautaire et le bien-être communautaire vont de pair? C’est certainement le cas dans de nombreux pays en voie de développement, où le développement durable est vu comme étant une voie d’avenir. Lors de la séance intitulée Community Empowerment through Public Participation Process (« Les processus de participation publique, outils de renforcement communautaire »), Caroline Uoko et Margaret Owuor, Ph. D., partageront les résultats d’études de cas réalisées au Kenya, où la gestion participative des ressources est une pratique relativement récente. Ces études mettent en lumière la nécessité de stimuler et d’influencer les communautés situées à proximité des ressources naturelles afin qu’elles participent à la gestion de ces ressources.

Volunteer Opportunities with IAP2 Canada (May/June 2018)

Do you want to get more involved with IAP2 Canada? We have a number of openings for volunteers on our committees: Communications & Marketing; Training; On-Site Volunteers for the 2018 IAP2 North American Conference. 

Communications & Marketing Committee

Do you have marketing and communications skills to share?

As a Communications and Marketing Committee member, you can help Canadians know the value of IAP2 Canada. You will participate in the development and implementation of new and updated tools and programs based on the 2017 IAP2 Canada Communications and Marketing Strategy Plan. And you can work in a team environment with like-minded people with a passion for promoting IAP2 Canada. This is a one-year renewable volunteer position.

Deadline for applications is June 11, 2018Communications & Marketing Committee Application.


IAP2 North American Conference on-site Volunteers

Would you like to be a part of an exciting conference?

As a member of the on-site team of volunteers, you will create an inviting atmosphere for event attendees, a successful experience for the sponsors and exhibitors, and meet P2 people from across North America. The conference is held in Victoria, B.C. at the Victoria Conference Centre. On-site volunteers are needed for registration desk and conference hosts from September 5 to 7, 2018.

Deadline for applications is June 30, 2018. 2018 IAP2 NAC On-Site Volunteer Job Description and Application.


Training Committee
Do you have a passion for encouraging lifelong learning?

As a Training Committee member, you can help inspire better public participation. You will participate in the development and implementation of new and updated tools and programs based on IAP2 Canada Training Strategy Plan. And you can work in a team environment with like-minded people with a passion for promoting P2 through IAP2 Canada. This is a one-year renewable volunteer position.

Deadline for applications is June 11, 2018. 2018 Training Committee Job Description and Application

The 2018 IAP2 North American Conference — what’s on tap?

(P2 is a Team Sport)

What happens when your city’s growth suddenly explodes and new initiatives demand public participation? “Engagement fatigue” and staff burnout follow — that’s what. The city of Austin, Texas, has seen its population grow over the last decade to the tune of 100 people per day, and the situation has not been helped by often vitriolic divisions of opinion.

The solution? The Conversation Corps: a team of trained volunteer facilitators, dedicated to promoting civil dialogue and pushing the envelope of P2 best practices. We’re excited to welcome folks from Austin with P2 is a Team Sport, the story of their five-year journey. You’ll get some on-the-ground insights on promoting a culture of civil discourse and how to work with other agencies to grow a P2 culture.

(Inclusive Engagement with Vancouver’s Chinatown)

Vancouver, BC, is famous for its Chinatown, but that historic community has felt itself in danger of being swallowed up by the rapid growth of the city. Public processes have failed to be inclusive, leading to distrust and loss of community support for projects and plans.

In Inclusive Engagement with Vancouver’s Chinatown, Miranda Eng of Context Research will share their recent collaborative work with community members from Vancouver’s Chinatown to co-create a model to guide culturally respectful planning and design of engagement processes.

(Using Directed Storytelling and Journey Mapping ….)

“Storytelling” has become more popular in recent years for drawing out opinions and ideas, but how do you put it to work effectively in a P2 process? The session, Using Directed Storytelling and Journey Mapping For Deep Engagement, uses the Salt Lake City Library as its object lesson. The Library uses world cafes, focus groups and storytelling to determine what its customers need, want and hope for — and it appears to be working: the Library recently got an historic increase to its budget. Peter Bromberg of the Salt Lake City Library and Stacee Adams of Somers-Jaramillo + Associates will provide you with tools you can use right away in your own practice.

(Public Engagement on Critical Public Policy ….)

When emotions run high in any issue, a proper public engagement approach is often the only road to a solution. The Province of Ontario is tackling racism head-on, and Public engagement on critical public policy: Managing Ontario’s Anti-Racism Consultation describes the P2 process used to develop a constructive dialogue around this vital issue. Roanne Argyle and Brendan Agnew-Iler designed and implemented an engagement strategy for Ontario’s Anti-Racism Directorate. They invited the community to help lead the process and welcomed conflict and emotion into the process, so that energy could be harnessed. Plan to attend this session to learn how they did it.

(Prevent “Truth Decay”)

Do public participation professionals have an obligation to help stakeholders find the truth or are we only obligated to capture their “truth?” That’s a good question, and in Prevent “Truth Decay,” Sam Imperati and Devin Howington will show how the P2 profession is in the perfect position to ensure that issues are explored – not debated, and decisions are informed – not reactionary. You’ll come away with insights and approaches for separating opinions from facts and better able to promote trust and encourage stakeholder collaboration.

(User Experience Design)

When setting up a public consultation process, have you ever thought that the best practices could be found in a shopping mall? Dave Meslin, originator of the Dazzling Notice Awards (and partner in the Visual Engagement Award, to be presented at this year’s Core Values Awards), posits that P2 practitioners could learn a lot from Apple, Wal-Mart and The Home Depot, in their customer engagement practices. providing welcoming, engaging environments for customers. User Experience Design: What Governments can Learn from IKEA and Apple looks at the way they provide welcoming, engaging environments, and compares that to the often unfriendly and intimidating world of government spaces and programs.

(Community Empowerment through P2 Process)

Did you know that community participation and community well-being go hand in hand? That’s certainly the case in many developing countries, as they look towards sustainable development as the way of the future. In Community Empowerment through Public Participation Process, Caroline Uoko and Dr Margaret Owuor will share findings of case studies in Kenya, where participatory resource management is still relatively new. These studies demonstrate the importance of inspiring communities next to natural resources to be part of the management of those resources.

Member Profile – May/June 2018: Shawn Bravender, CP3

shawnbravenderPOSITION Community Engagement Lead, Edmonton Office, ISL Engineering

How long have you been in P2, and where have you worked?

I’ve been in P2 about 8 years solid, and then before that, I was a planner, where most of what I did was P2 – so I’ve been involved with public participation for a total of just over  17 years. I worked for the City of Twin Falls, Idaho, then went to Stantec, and then a couple of years ago, I went to ISL.

What turned you on to P2 in the first place?

I just gravitated towards it through the planning stream. I’m most interested in long-range projects, and those are the ones tend to have support for more meaningful P2– so I get to “play with the public”.  Just working with people, collaboratively coming up with solutions and facing challenges. Usually at the start of a project, there’s a lot of negative emotion but by the time the project is finished, people are generally happy and it’s fun to be a part of that.

At ISL, I get to work on a lot of municipal policies such as development plans, transportation master plans, parks and recreation planning, and active modes planning – where I get to work with the public. I also have been privileged to work with the Alberta Government on Regional and sub regional plans such as the recent Caribou Range plan.

Have you had any “big wins”?

Yes. Those come when you’re working with clients over the years that were reluctant at first to do engagement. They felt confined by the idea of having the public actually participate in their projects; but I was able to bring them to see the benefits of public participation projects that were more collaborative with communities.

When you were working as a planner, did P2 seem to be a novel concept?

Not that long ago, public participation  was a novel concept for many, but to me, that was the only way to do it. I’ve always been passionate about P2 and the role it can play. In fact, the Province of Alberta has recently updated the Municipal Government Act, including a requirement for every municipality to have a public participation policy. In Alberta, there’s certainly a lot of growth in the awareness of the need. That’s a big change from ten or fifteen years ago: back then, only the really progressive municipalities were doing meaningful engagement.

Have you had any “golden learning moment”?

I found myself in the middle of a discussion that was increasing in intensity and I realized that it wasn’t going where it needed to. But I was able to shift gears in the conversation to validate their experience and watch the emotions subside. People need to be heard and validated, not run through a process and patronized.

What are your interests?

I have a large family that I’m very proud of and I do a lot of volunteer work with youth groups. As well anything to do with cycling excites me. I was involved in 2007 when Edmonton did its cycling plan update, and in 2012, I was project manager for cycling infrastructure engagement for several different neighbourhoods. I worked on the Lethbridge cycling master plan, the Medicine Leisure Trail Master Plan, and led the engagement for the first phase of Calgary’s city centre cycle track, to name a few.

Why do you suppose there’s so much animosity towards increasing cycling infrastructure?

Change, for one thing; and it’s also perceived to serve a very small percentage of the public. Now, if you just count cyclists, you could say that. But good cycling infrastructure not only supports cyclists, it reduces motor vehicle traffic,  improves transit, and increases pedestrian activity. There are a lot of spinoff benefits to the greater community.  Studies have proven again and again that the best communities … the ones with the highest quality of life, have advanced cycling infrastructure.

You are one of only eight P2 practitioners to have the CP3 designation – Certified Public Participation Professional. What does that mean for you?

I find it’s invaluable. It’s the opportunity to have credentials that match the experience and knowledge and to showcase that to clients. As well, it’s exciting to be on the leading edge of CP3 for the IAP2 community across the country. I believe in the value of having the CP3 certification and to be on the front end of it. It’s also a huge benefit for the team I work with, because it enhances our ability, as an engineering firm, to win contracts and show that we’re on the leading edge of P2. My employer – Connstance Gourley – knows those benefits. She started engagement back in 2004, adding staff and training. She’s made the atmosphere and the culture here at ISL conducive to P2 – and made it well worth my making the move when I did, including corporate support for my CP3 efforts.

If you had anything to say to someone just getting into the P2 business …

Come in with your eyes wide-open and your mind set to “learn”. Both from the professionals and from the public and stakeholders.

 

Webinar Rewind – May 2018: “Our Community Could Blow Up – Do We Have Time for some Quick Consultation?” (Denver Encore)

Robbie Burns’ famous prayer was for protection from “things that go ‘bump’ in the night”, but in October 2012, near Shreveport, Louisiana, it was no “bump”. It was a colossal explosion, and no one immediately knew the cause. When the cause – and the planned solution – were discovered, it touched off a different kind of fireworks.

The cause was millions of pounds of M6 explosive – the propellent used to fire large guns, like tank guns and heavy artillery – which had been stored at Camp Minden National Guard Base. It was too old to be any use – and highly unstable. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other responsible agencies planned to burn the explosives in the open – considered “best practice”. The community had other thoughts on the matter and in the social and political melee that followed, Kristi Parker Celico and Doug Sarno, MCP3, were called in to facilitate public consultation sessions to find an alternative.

Except they didn’t have the luxury of time.

BOOMThe military repeatedly reminded everyone that another major explosion could happen at any moment.

So how did Kristi and Doug manage to marshal the military, the environmental experts, the community members, the activists and the various government agencies (none of whom wanted the responsibility) and come up with a solution? The May webinar – a reprise of their presentation at the 2017 IAP2 North American Conference – is revealing, inspiring and at times hilarious (in its own macabre way) as we learn how two experienced professionals took charge of the situation and quickly but methodically brought in a solution before something else went “ka-BOOM!” in the night.

IAP2 members can watch the webinar here. (The IAP2 Webinar Archive is a benefit exclusive to members of IAP2 Canada.)

Webinar Rewind: April 2018

Core Values Award Winners – project categories Part 2

CANADA: LAWS (Liard Aboriginal Women’s Society) and Beringia Community Planning, Indigenous Engagement Award for “Youth4Safety”

Tackling the problem of violence against Indigenous women and girls in a small northern community, and making sure as many voices as possible were heard in developing a long-range, multi-modal transportation plan, were the last two Core Values Award winners featured in our monthly webinars.

In addressing a problem of sexualized violence against Aboriginal women and girls, an initiative named Youth4Safety spearheaded by the Liard Aboriginal Women’s Society (LAWS) and supported by Beringia Community Planning won the IAP2 Canada Award for Indigenous Engagement. The groups determined to make the plan local to the community, so it was relevant at all points, and to empower youth, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal.

DSC_9313

There are numerous barriers when it comes to engaging young people. Lack of interest is one, as is an inability of decision-makers to see the value in engaging young people; perhaps an even bigger barrier is the lack of meaningful roles for youth. The Youth4Safety project set out to overcome all of those.

Beringia’s Sarah Gillett says decision-makers often underestimate the ability of young people to contribute to a process; but in this case, they were given the key role. The project presented educational tools to help youth deal with sexualized violence, but the project also drew on the local culture and the experiences of the young people, themselves, all while ensuring the safety needed for youth to participate. They were empowered to apply what they learned in designing an awareness campaign and then share their work with the broader community.

No fewer than 16 agencies collaborated on the project, including LAWS, the RCMP, local tribal justice departments, the local high school and drug and alcohol counselling services. A unique feature of the process was that it was based in local Kaska culture, focusing on peer support, a system designed by youth for youth, and dene à nezen, which is a Kaska term to describe “dignity and respect”.

While the long term impact of their work is still to be understood, an evaluation of Youth4Safety has identified the following results to date:

For the participating youth:

  •         An ability to describe the issues relating to sexualized violence (such as gender, social responses, racism, mental health)
  •         An increased willingness and comfort talking about sexualized violence
  • An ability to identify concrete actions they can take to respond to violence against women and girls
  • An increase in concrete skills they can use to get involved in taking action on issues of sexualized violence (such as campaigning, communication, using the media)
  • Increased sense of connection among Youth – provided a network Youth trust to approach with sexualized violence issues, potential to provide support for Youth victims of sexualized violence
  • Increased confidence and self-efficacy – being a part of this team gave Youth an opportunity to build their confidence and recognize their ability to build a safer community
  • Building a stronger support network – more aware of resources, community organizations, and a network of people who care about sexualized violence against women and can help

For the broader community:

  •         Increased knowledge about violence against women and girls, the extent of the issue and the impact on Youth
  •         Increased appreciation for the knowledge Youth have on the topic of sexualized violence and the role they can play in raising awareness on this issue

==

USA: Tennessee Department of Transportation – General Project Award for “Long Range Transportation Plan”

Every five years, the Tennessee Department of Transportation has to produce a 25-year long-range transportation plan, and with 6.5 million people — a third of whom live in rural areas — to serve, the challenge is to make sure public money is spent in the best way possible. Complicating matters is the sudden in-migration of people: ever since Nashville was designated an “It” city by the New York Times, 100 people move there per day.

By 2013, transportation infrastructure projects had fallen behind to the tune of $6 billion, so the problem was clear: how to come up with a plan that Tennesseans could stand behind. Tanisha Hall — TDOT’s Director of Long-Range Planning — and her staff had to reach urban and rural areas with the same message, be consistent with the outreach efforts, build input that would directly influence the decisions, and define and target traditionally underserved sectors of the population.

The tools and techniques included regional summits, focus groups and “Book-a-Planner” Outreach, where staff would take the message to local groups. They took the message to places where people traditionally met, such as Rotary and Chamber of Commerce meetings, giving people the straight goods on the challenges TDOT was facing; they questioned the people interactively on what their transportation priorities were.

Tanisha explains that they learned quite a few valuable lessons about engagement: make sure that an engagement plan is an integral part of the plan; be flexible; think through the entire process ahead of time and identify potential obstacles; and make it enjoyable.

Tanisha & Gov Haslam

So successful was the outreach, that towards the end of the process, Governor Bill Haslam (centre, above; looking toward Tanisha) used Tanisha’s engagement process at some of the events, which led to the legislature passing a gas tax increase to fund transportation infrastructure and TDOT won the IAP2 USA Core Values Award — General Project.

CHAPTER NEWS – March 2018

BC

BC DEEP DIVE-1The BC Chapter hosted its first event of 2018 in Victoria on February 7. Drew Snider presented and led an interactive “Deep Dive” discussion about media relations & P2 with an engaged bunch of members and non-members.

Being able to tell the story you want about engagement through the media is important. Helping reporters and editors understand what “good” and “proper” public consultation looks like can help preserve the integrity of the process, even when vocal opponents try to discredit it. Discussion touched on ways of doing that — including the ever-popular “elevator pitch”.

We are pleased to welcome the Canadian Trainers Collective to Vancouver for Foundations training in March and the Courageous Leadership Project training in Vancouver in April. For details on the dates and to register please visit: www.iap2bc.ca/training-events/.

WILD ROSE

P2 Talks: Changing Engagement for a Changing City

Jane PurvisThe Wild Rose chapter is pleased to have hosted two successful joint presentations of Jane Purvis’ presentation IAP2: ‘Changing Engagement for a Changing City’ in both Calgary and Edmonton along with the Alberta Professional Planners Institute (APPI). Both events were well attended by a diverse audience from both IAP2 and APPI.  The luncheons provided the audience an opportunity to hear Jane discuss the City of Edmonton’s recently concluded 3-year-long Council-sponsored Initiative on Public Engagement that resulted in significant changes to Edmonton’s engagement policy and approach. (See the special report by Tannis Topolnisky in this newsletter.) Thank you to everyone that was able to attend and remember to check out our website for upcoming professional development and networking events.

Anne Harding is Wild Rose’s newest CP3

ANNE HARDING-2We are pleased to celebrate Anne Harding as one of Canada’s newest Certified Public Participation Professionals (CP3). Jessica Delaney and Yvonne Morrison were also granted the certification, along with Anne. Anne is the Owner of Forum Relations, a Calgary based consulting company dedicated to sustainable decision-making through effective community engagement. Along with being the most immediate Past-President of IAP2 Canada, she also works as Stakeholder & Aboriginal Relations Senior Advisor at Suncor Energy. With Anne’s certification, the Wild Rose Chapter now has the most CP3’s in the country- a fact we are very proud of!

Save the date: April 27, 2018

IAP2 WR AGM, Networking and Core Value Awards Learning Opportunity

City of Calgary 2 (1)
City of Calgary’s Engagement team bolstered by ISL Engineering

What can be more exciting than an AGM you ask?  How about an opportunity to learn from two of last year’s core value award winners?  Join us to hear about The City of Calgary’s Crowchild Trail Extension project and the Calgary Board of Education’s 2016 Transportation Study which goes beyond presenting and includes some skill building.

Calgary School Board (1)
Karen Drummond (l) and Carrie Edwards flank Richard Delaney of Delaney + Associates

In between these two interactive sessions will be the AGM and a networking lunch. This is a great way to find out about what the chapter has been up to for the last year and possibilities for the upcoming year.  We would love for you to join us!

Date: Friday April 27, 2018

Location: Fort Calgary (750 – 9th Ave SE)

Keep your eyes out for more details as they emerge.  In the meantime, book yourself out for April 27!

PRAIRIES

OGDiscussions on Open Government come to the Queen City in April. The Prairies Chapter is hosting the latest in the Open Dialogue series, an opportunity for all Canadians to weigh in on Ottawa’s efforts towards increased transparency, public engagement and improved access.

What do “open government” and “open dialogue” mean to you? What issues would benefit most from increased dialogue and collaboration between government and citizens? The Treasury Board Secretariat will provide an overview of the initiatives so far and facilitate the conversation, April 9 in Regina. Register here — it’s free, but there’s a limit of 40.

 

The IAP2 Prairies Chapter held two successful AGMs on February 6, one in Winnipeg and a joint AGM between Regina and Saskatoon. The Chapter shared highlights of the past year and provided an opportunity for people interested in public engagement to learn more about IAP2 and membership benefits. After the AGM, both locations hosted a learning opportunity for attendees.

In Winnipeg, Morgan Vespa from the City of Winnipeg’s Office of Public Engagement facilitated a discussion regarding what the Office has achieved and the future of engagement in the City of Winnipeg. Regina hosted Samantha Mark, Prairie Wild Consulting Co., who shared case studies of their diverse work, the approach used in engagement and facilitation, and lessons learned.

The IAP2 Prairies Chapter is offering P2 training in the near future:

IAP2 Fundamentals in Public Participation

Planning module

March 27-29, 2018 – Regina, SK

Techniques module

April 18-19, 2018 – Regina, SK

IAP2 Strategies for Public Opposition & Outrage in Public Participation

(formerly called IAP2 Emotion, Outrage & Public Participation)

May 8 & 9, 2018 – Winnipeg, MB

May 15 & 16, 2018 – Regina, SK

For more information and to register please visit: http://iap2canada.ca/prairie

GREAT LAKES

Great Lakes Chapter members gathered in Burlington on Feb 22 and talked about “the tools we use”, highlighting tools and techniques used that are innovative and in most cases, FUN!

Group PhotoThe group heard about:

Mentimeter which is a free software tool that helps to create fun and interactive presentations where participants use their mobile devices to participate.

Feedback Frame in actionFeedback Frames which is a tool that can be used for large group decision making using secret rating with instant visuals (see the photo for one in use at the meeting).  This method of engagement is based on the concept of dotmocracy but allows for anonymous voting.

RetroViewerWe went back in time and used RetroViewers – you remember these, we called them ViewMasters.  These were used to show residents what a current parcel of land looked like and what it COULD look like after re-development of the site.  A fun and interactive to show people concepts.

Online Town Hall was demonstrated.  This is a great way to have people participate without having to actually come out to a townhall meeting.

Interested and want more info?  Visit:

www.terrapurestoneycreek.com/onlineopenhouse-example1/

www.mentimeter.com

www.feedbackframes.com

www.image3d.com

Keep on eye out for the IAP2 Great Lakes Newsletter for our next social P2 event. Have an idea for our next social get together? Let us know at greatlakeschapter@iap2canada.ca